Maidstone State Park
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Maidstone State Park

Maidstone is the most remote of Vermont's state parks and still retains much of the character associated with the Northeast Kingdom. Maidstone Lake was created when glacial ice carved out a deep basin in a preexisting valley. When the last glaciers melted 12,000 years ago, a deep, clear and cold lake was formed. The lake offers good lake trout and salmon fishing and has had some outstanding record catches. Maidstone Lake is a great location to view nesting loons. The loon loves the solitude of the northern lakes whose shores are rimmed with spruce-fir shade. Once common in Vermont, the loon has recently been removed from the endangered species list, but remains a species of concern. Maidstone was designated by the state of Vermont as a state park in 1938. The camp areas were wilderness, but the area around the lodge was a Civilian Conservation Corps camp. The CCC built many sites with fireplaces for camping, the lodge, and a picnic shelter, which are still in use today. The lake offers good lake trout and salmon fishing and has had some outstanding record catches. Maidstone Lake is a great location to view nesting loons. The loon loves the solitude of the northern lakes whose shores are rimmed with spruce-fir shade. Once common in Vermont, the loon has recently been removed from the endangered species list, but remains a species of concern.
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